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Innovative startup reshaping the Peripheral Intravenous Catheter (PIV) market lays out current challenges and groundbreaking solution to a critical healthcare procedure.

SkyDance Vascular (SkyDance), a company established to transform the market for Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (PIV), today announces the debut of a new website, www.skydancevascular.com, aimed at supporting its upcoming fund raising efforts.

The new site comprehensively identifies the problems that exist with the traditional PIV design. It further details how SkyDance’s new product, the Osprey catheter delivery system, will re-imagine the catheter expecting that it will reduce complications resulting from the use of todays over-the-needle delivery systems.

SkyDance has designed its PIV with a contoured catheter inside of the needle. This patent-pending architecture is expected to eliminate exposure to infection-causing skin bacteria, as well as to improve first-attempt success,deliver fluids more efficiently, and reduce the risk of clinicians being stuck by a dirty needle.

“Safety, infection control, and proper medication delivery have been ever-increasing concerns for clinicians and patients,” said Bill Bold, chief executive officer of SkyDance. “Our new website, along with other collateral that has recently been developed, will help investors understand the market issues and goals we intend to establish.”

SkyDance has three provisional patents filed with 44 claims and employs six senior level executives all with prior experience in successfully launching startup businesses in vascular access.

“We have tremendous support from key opinion leaders in this field and are excited to partner with other visionaries focused on improving this critical health process,” Bold said. “Our new website offers investors a clear view of our dynamic approach and significant introductory information to educate them on our unique investment opportunity. We look forward to connecting with new partners through this important entry point to new conversations.”

About SkyDance Vascular
SkyDance Vascular, founded in 2017, is working to redesign the Peripheral Intravenous Catheter (PIV). Its new family of products, the Osprey catheter delivery system, will be launched in early 2021 and is expected to provide a positive impact on PIV bloodstream infections utilizing a uniquely designed process called Skin Avoidance Technology. Its goal is to deliver greater first-attempt success and lower complication rates, improved dwell times, greater completion of therapy rates, and increased patient satisfaction. The company has assembled an executive leadership group comprised of individuals with decades of executive, clinical, regulatory, and engineering experience, and who together have successfully built other companies in the vascular access space. For more information, visit https://www.skydancevascular.com or contact Bill Bold at bill.bold@skydancevascular.com.

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Phlebitis and Infiltration

Phlebitis (Rate: 22.7%) and Infiltration (Rate: 23.9%) are the result of inflammation, erosion, or the penetration of the catheter into or through the venous wall.1 Phlebitis and Infiltration can result from loss of surrounding venous wall integrity due to the inflammatory effects of wall shear stress by rapid infusions, chemical injury by caustic infusions, or needle / catheter injury incurred at the time of initial insertion. *

OspreyIV Feature – Contoured Directional Flow

Phlebitis and Infiltration can result from the inflammatory effects of wall shear stress induced by rapid infusions, chemical injuries induced by caustic infusions, or trauma caused by the needle or catheter at the time of initial insertion.

Contoured Directional Flow is designed for atraumatic initial catheter advancement. Once an infusion is initiated, the off-axis opening is intended to deliver fluids away from the delicate vein wall minimizing vessel wall shear stress

* Source references available upon request.

White Papers

The following White Papers are available for download

ADVANCING TOWARD THE EXPANSION OF CATHETER-RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTION REPORTING TO INCLUDE PIVS

There are an estimated 200 million PIVs placed per year in the United States. These catheters come with significant risks including hospital-acquired bloodstream infections. Recent studies show these infections occurring at an alarming rate. However, because of inconsistent coding and voluntary reporting, the fiscal and clinical impact on healthcare is likely larger than our current understanding. To begin to control these costs and create a safer patient environment it is expected that the Health and Human Services department of the CDC will mandate surveillance and reporting within the upcoming months.
The full whitepaper is available for download here. Download White Paper

Poor Procedural Success

A typical intravenous catheter (over the needle) consists of an inner needle and an outer catheter. Current intravenous catheters on the market have a gap between the outer catheter and the inner needle, the outer catheter also has a tapering or shoulder. This shoulder creates a significant change in push force. When intravenous catheters require greater penetration force, practitioners may push the wall of the blood vessel ineffectively, resulting in unsuccessful catheterization.

In a pilot study involving staff from 2 medical units, 3 surgical units, 2 pediatric units, and 2 intensive care units, data were collected from 371 patients. The mean number of IV insertion attempts was 2.18 (SD = 1.83) Number of attempts ranged from 1 to 14. 27% of patients required three or more insertion attempts.

OspreyIV – Bevel Only Technique

The traditional PIVC insertion sequence includes entering the vessel with the bevel of the needle and obtaining a blood flash. The angle is then lowered and further advanced, so the catheter enters the vessel as well. These manipulations often lead to unsuccessful insertion attempts.

The catheter of the Osprey IV is within the needle. As the needle enters the vessel, so does the catheter without further device advancement or re-positioning. Bevel Only Technique is designed to promote high procedural success rates.

PIV Related Bloodstream Infections

PIV related bloodstream infections pose a serious risk to hospitalized patients. These infections occur because a contaminant was introduced at some point during the use of the catheter. It is critical to understand the mode of contamination and the timing of the subsequent infection in order to formulate strategies to mitigate these risks.
The full whitepaper is available for download here.

Clinical Summary

PIVs are an irreplaceable tool within intravenous therapy. They are the most commonly placed vascular access device in healthcare. However, the traditional PIV design of mounting a catheter over a needle leaves the catheter exposed to bacteria on and within the skin. This bacteria contaminates the external surface of the catheter during insertion, matures on the catheter within the biofilm, and ultimately becomes large enough to break free and cause a bloodstream infection. To truly break this cycle, physical barriers must be in place to avoid catheter – skin contact during insertion. The Osprey by SkyDance Vascular is the only vascular access device to provide catheter protection during insertion.
The full whitepaper is available for download here.

Needlestick Injuries

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5.6 million workers in the health care industry and related occupations are at risk of occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and others.  Each year, hospital-based health care workers sustain an estimated 384,000 percutaneous (skin puncture) injuries from needles and other sharp devices or more than 1,000 injuries per day. As many as one-third of all sharps injuries occur during the disposal of the device. *

OspreyIV Feature – Passive Needle Retraction

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reports as many as one-third of all sharps injuries occur during disposal of the device.

Passive Needle Retraction is designed to eliminate exposure to post-procedure sharps. Once the catheter is fully advanced, the needle automatically retracts into the housing. It is then safely and permanently retained without any sharps to transport for disposal.

* Source references available upon request.

Contamination and Infection

Staphlococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a normally occurring bacteria on and within human skin, within hair follicles, and within sebaceous glands.* It has been identified as one of the most common causes of hospital associated bloodborne infections.*


S.aureus cannot be removed from all layers of the skin prior to a PIV insertion. Most antimicrobial agents effectively eradicate bacteria from the surface but not from the stratum corneum. The rates of eradication from the stratum corneum after surface treatment with 70% ethanol chlorhexidine-ethanol and povidone-iodine were not statistically different from those of the control sites (no surface treatment at all). *


It is understood vascular access devices (PIVCs) may be contaminated by infectious bacteria during insertion by the catheter coming in direct contact with bacterial flora throughout the layers of the skin. This bacterium adheres to the extraluminal surface of catheter, forms large microcolonies, and ultimately detaches into the blood stream to cause infection.3, 7 10-50% of hospital related S. aureus bloodborne infections are associated with PIVCs.2 Infections rates for PIVCs have been reported as high as 1.45%.*

OspreyIV Feature – Skin Avoidance Technology

It is understood vascular access devices such as PIVCs may be contaminated by infectious bacteria during insertion by the catheter coming in direct contact with bacterial flora throughout the layers of the skin. 

The Osprey IV deploys the catheter through-the-needle rather than over-the-needle. This unique design is intended to form a physical barrier between the catheter and harmful bacteria on and within the skin and protect the catheter from insertion related contamination.

* Source references available upon request.

Contamination and Infection

A typical intravenous catheter (over the needle) consists of an inner needle and an outer catheter. Current intravenous catheters on the market have a gap between the outer catheter and the inner needle, the outer catheter also has a tapering or shoulder. This shoulder creates a significant change in push force. When intravenous catheters require greater penetration force, practitioners may push the wall of the blood vessel ineffectively, resulting in unsuccessful catheterization.

In a pilot study involving staff from 2 medical units, 3 surgical units, 2 pediatric units, and 2 intensive care units, data were collected from 371 patients. The mean number of IV insertion attempts was 2.18 (SD = 1.83) Number of attempts ranged from 1 to 14. 27% of patients required three or more insertion attempts.

Bloodstream Infections

While healthcare professionals disinfect the skin surface prior to each PIV or EDC insertion, the skin still remains a point of possible infection. Simply put, the skin surface cannot be fully sterilized in preparation for catheter insertion. Furthermore, 20% of the normal skin flora resides below the skin surface, in hair follicles and sweat glands. Therefore, all traditional PIV and EDCs are at inherent risk because they come in direct contact with residual skin flora during each insertion. Flora such as S. aureus adheres to the catheter surface, grows and aggregates into microcolonies, ultimately breaks off into the bloodstream and a catheter-related bloodborne infection is the result. In published studies, colonization of vascular access devices passing through the skin during insertion ranged from 17% – 57.6%.

These infections place the patient at significant risk including developing sepsis and at times, death. It is thought that mandatory CMS reporting will occur within 6-12 months and treatment of these hospital-acquired infections could be subject to non-reimbursement by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) at a non-reimbursed average of $30,000 per case. Recent studies indicate that over 36% of catheter blood infections are related to PIVs, with an estimated 200,000 PIV bloodborne infections per year in the U.S., amounting to nearly $6B annual cost.

SkyDance will address bloodstream infections with our Skin Avoidance Technology.

Insertion Success Rate And Vessel Damage

Current catheter designs rely on the needle acting as a “rail” for the correct placement of the catheter, which often results in the damage or perforation of the innermost layer of the vessel known as phlebitis. This damage can also lead to clot formation which may block the flow of fluid out of the catheter. When the catheter is advanced over the needle, it is led straight to, and sometimes through the vessel.
This needle advancement can also cause an infiltration, or the infusion of fluids into the surrounding tissue. If the fluid is chemically irritating it can cause harm to surrounding tissue, referred to as an extravasation. Irritants often cause pain and inflammation at the IV site and along the vein path. This issue can ultimately result in tissue sloughing, loss of mobility in the extremity, and infection.
SkyDance will address these complications with our Bevel Only Technique.

Bloodstream Infections

While healthcare professionals disinfect the skin surface prior to each PIV or EDC insertion, the skin still remains a point of possible infection. Simply put, the skin surface cannot be fully sterilized in preparation for catheter insertion. Furthermore, 20% of the normal skin flora resides below the skin surface, in hair follicles and sweat glands. Therefore, all traditional PIV and EDCs are at inherent risk because they come in direct contact with residual skin flora during each insertion. Flora such as S. aureus adheres to the catheter surface, grows and aggregates into microcolonies, ultimately breaks off into the bloodstream and a catheter-related bloodborne infection is the result. In published studies, colonization of vascular access devices passing through the skin during insertion ranged from 17% – 57.6%.

These infections place the patient at significant risk including developing sepsis and at times, death. It is thought that mandatory CMS reporting will occur within 6-12 months and treatment of these hospital-acquired infections could be subject to non-reimbursement by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) at a non-reimbursed average of $30,000 per case. Recent studies indicate that over 36% of catheter blood infections are related to PIVs, with an estimated 200,000 PIV bloodborne infections per year in the U.S., amounting to nearly $6B annual cost.

SkyDance will address bloodstream infections with our Skin Avoidance Technology.

Insertion Success Rate And Vessel Damage

Current catheter designs rely on the needle acting as a “rail” for the correct placement of the catheter, which often results in the damage or perforation of the innermost layer of the vessel known as phlebitis. This damage can also lead to clot formation which may block the flow of fluid out of the catheter. When the catheter is advanced over the needle, it is led straight to, and sometimes through the vessel.

This needle advancement can also cause an infiltration, or the infusion of fluids into the surrounding tissue. If the fluid is chemically irritating it can cause harm to surrounding tissue, referred to as an extravasation. Irritants often cause pain and inflammation at the IV site and along the vein path. This issue can ultimately result in tissue sloughing, loss of mobility in the extremity, and infection.

SkyDance will address these complications with our Bevel Only Technique.

Inefficient Fluid Delivery

Because of the over-the-needle design, traditional PIVs are forced to deposit infusions directly from their distal tip and along the sensitive inner lining of the vessel. These infusions can damage this lining and chemically cause inflammation, loss of PIV function, and ultimately PIV failure. To mitigate these complications, infusions should be directed away from the inner lining of the vessel and into its center of the vessel where comparatively faster blood flow dilutes the infusions and protects the vessel. SkyDance will address these complications with our Contoured Directional Flow.

Needlestick Injuries

Needlestick injuries are wounds caused by needles that accidentally puncture the clinician’s skin. These injuries are a hazard for people who work with catheters and can occur at any time when healthcare workers use, disassemble, or dispose of the catheter.

A needle stick can cause serious issues to a clinician emotionally and physically by transmitting infectious diseases, especially blood-borne viruses. Concern includes the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) which leads to AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. Injuries have also transmitted many other diseases involving viruses, bacteria, fungi, and other microorganisms to health care workers. SkyDance will address these complications with our Passive Needle Retraction.

Poor Procedural Success

A typical intravenous catheter (over the needle) consists of an inner needle and an outer catheter. Current intravenous catheters on the market have a gap between the outer catheter and the inner needle, the outer catheter also has a tapering or shoulder. This shoulder creates a significant change in push force. When intravenous catheters require greater penetration force, practitioners may push the wall of the blood vessel ineffectively, resulting in unsuccessful catheterization. *

In a pilot study involving staff from 2 medical units, 3 surgical units, 2 pediatric units, and 2 intensive care units, data were collected from 371 patients. The mean number of IV insertion attempts was 2.18 (SD = 1.83) Number of attempts ranged from 1 to 14. 27% of patients required three or more insertion attempts. *

OspreyIV Feature – Bevel Only Technique

The traditional PIVC insertion sequence includes entering
the vessel with the bevel of the needle and obtaining a blood flash. The angle
is then lowered and further advanced, so the catheter enters the vessel as
well. These manipulations often lead to unsuccessful insertion attempts.

The catheter of the Osprey IV is within the needle. As the
needle enters the vessel, so does the catheter without further device
advancement or re-positioning. Bevel Only Technique is designed to promote high
procedural success rates.


* Source references available upon request.

Sharon Luboff

Board of Directors / Advisor

Sharon is a career medical device executive with over 30 years of success across multiple therapeutic areas and geographies. Key achievements in international expansion, business development, strategic repositioning and turnaround, and bringing new technologies through the development process and into commercialization. Broad functional expertise and proven leadership capabilities. Experience: Operating Partner; Altamont Capital, Group Vice President; CR Bard, Vice President; Baxter Healthcare

Inefficient Fluid Delivery - Today

As PIV/EDC catheters advance during insertion, it is belived that the catheter lays along the bottom of the vien delivering fluid that could cause harm to the areas it touches.

Contoured Directional Flow

Designed to deliver fluids more efficiently, lowering the potential risk of chemical damage.

Needle Stick Injuries - Today

Clinicians risk getting stuck by contaminated needles if the don't actively engage the safety mechanisms.

Passive Needle Retraction

The needle passively retracts into the housing without the need for the clinician to engage as a separate safety mechanism.

Bloodstream Infections - Today

Catheter is on the outside of the needle leading to colonized catheters.

Skin Avoidance Technology

The catheter never touches the skin, minimizing the risk of becoming colonized.

Vessel Damage - Today

Patient are at risk of needle manipulation. Multiple attempts often require two or more catheters and kits and risk vessel damage.

Bevel Only Technique

The Needle does not have to penetrate past the initial entry, improving the likelihood of 1st attempt success and reducing the risk of infiltration.